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I enjoy writing my blog posts, but it is getting better when you know that someone is reading them. The real magic happens when someone leaves a comment and I can start discussing the subject.

I learned that you have to expose your blog posts as much you can, without spamming or being annoying, to have a chance to someone read them.

Create a stunning Github profile

Let’s create an attractive Github profile (by naveenkumarj ) to catch the reader’s attention. A summary to creating a context for this blog post:

  1. Create a new repository with the same name as your github username
  2. Create a README.md file at the repository root
  3. Access this awesome open source project (by @Rahuldkjain) to help you to generate the README.md file content
  4. Copy and paste the generated content into your README.md and commit it

The result will be something like my Github profile:

Dynamically listing your recent blog posts

Now we are going to add the latest blog posts to my GitHub profile by using Github Actions (by @avdev4j ) with the help of this addon (by @gautamkrishnar)

The above code implements a workflow to update a github profile README.md with the 5 latest posts from my blog feed. This workflow was defined to start manually by using workflow_dispatch option. You can change my feed URL to use your dev. to account, for example, my dev.to feed is https://dev.to/feed/renanfranca .

I am going to show you how to make it works.

Let’s change that workflow to execute automatically every hour. Replace this

on: 
    workflow_dispatch:

for

on: 
    schedule:
        - cron: '0 * * * *'

The final file will be like this

A special thanks to @Rahuldkjain and @gautamkrishnar for building the awesome open source projects that I used on this post. Please, visit rahuldkjain’s project repository and gautamkrishnar’s project repository and give it a star 🤩


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